Face à l’Opinion: Senator Samuel Madistin on Corruption and Peasant Demonstrations in the Artibonite, 17 Apr. 1996

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Download: Face à l’Opinion: Senatè Samuel Madistin sou Manifestasyon Peyizan ak Koripsyon ODVA nan Latibonit, 17 avril 1996 (1)

Face à l’Opinion: Senatè Samuel Madistin sou Manifestasyon Peyizan ak Koripsyon ODVA nan Latibonit, 17 avril 1996 (2)

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Outspoken and controversial Senator Samuel Madistin discusses the struggle and demonstrations of peasant farmers in the Artibonite who, since 1989, have lacked access to water for their crops. He blames inefficiency and corruption on the part of the Organisme du Développement de la Vallée de l’Artibonite (ODVA), Care, and PADF, which he describes as a “permanent plot against the peasants.” He also denounces the Plan National d’Éducation et de Formation (PNEF), because of a scholarship program that would require accepting loans from the Inter-American Development Bank that would not reinforce existing state structures. He criticizes privatization in general, especially as a condition of aid from the US. Madistin was a member of the OPL party, which at the time stood for Organisation Politique Lavalas. The following year, in 1997, it would break with Fanmi Lavalas and change its name to Organisation du Peuple en Lutte (Òganizasyon Pèp kap Lite). Interview Jean Dominique.

“Privatization and development are like milk and lemon. They don’t go together. They are like dogs and cats. That is my deep conviction.” – Samuel Madistin

Face à l’Opinion: Father Rénald Clérismé on the First Anniversary of Jean-Marie Vincent’s Assassination, 24 Aug. 1995

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Face à l’Opinion: Pè Rénald Clérismé sou Premyè Anivèsè Asasina Jean-Marie Vincent, 24/8/1995 (1)

Face à l’Opinion: Pè Rénald Clérismé sou Premyè Anivèsè Asasina Jean-Marie Vincent, 24/8/1995 (2)

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Father Jean Marie Vincent, a Catholic priest who founded the peasant rights association “Tet Kole Ti Peyizan Ayisyen” in the small town of Jean Rabel, was assassinated on August 28, 1994 under the military regime. On the first anniversary of Father Vincent’s death, Jean Renald Clérismé, a former Catholic priest (and eventual Minister of Foreign Affairs of Haiti from 2006- 2008) remembers Jean Marie Vincent, his devotion to the peasantry (“Jean-Marie grew up with a boundless love for the peasantry”) and his commitment to liberation theology and universal dignity for all. Clérismé also discusses development and underdevelopment, corruption, and the role of the international community in Haiti, as well as Aristide’s return and the US and UN occupations of 1994-1995. Clérismé explains that in order to truly honor Jean-Marie Vincent’s memory, they must seek justice not only for him but for all the victims of the regime, including the poor and invisible. Interview Jean Dominique.

“Everyone is demanding justice for Janboul [Jean-Marie], justice for [Antoine] Izméry, justice for [Guy] Malary, because those people were visible. But a penniless unfortunate on the street, that they seize and they beat, and they take him and rape his brothers, rape his sisters, rape his mother – those people, too, they deserve to be commemorated, for us to say that they were people too and to put them together with Janboul. We can’t honor Janboul if we don’t put those people’s problems together with the commemoration we’re doing for him.” – Rénald Clérismé

Caritas’ Efforts to Replace the Creole Pig, November 1986

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Download: Reportage cochons créole/caritas Nov 86, 4ème partie

Discussion of the eradication of the Creole pig in the early 1980s (due to fears of swine flu) through the Programme pour l’Eradication de la Peste Porcine Africaine et pour le Développement de l’Elevage Porcin (PEPPADEP), and the eradication program’s deleterious effects on the peasants.  At the time, the Creole pig was a main source of financial possibility stability for peasant families — “the peasant’s bank.”  Initial attempts to replace Creole pigs with industrial North American pigs were disastrous, as the North American pigs were ill-suited to the environment and Haitian peasants lacked the means to care for them. The program discusses subsequent attempts by the Catholic NGO Caritas to replace the Creole pig with similar pigs imported from Jamaica.