Inter-Actualités Magazine, Special Report: The Slaughter at Jean Rabel, late July 1987

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Download: Inter-Actualités Magazine, Repòtaj Spesyal: Masak Jean Rabel (l’Hécatombe de Jean Rabel), fen jiye 1987 (1)

Inter-Actualités Magazine, Repòtaj Spesyal: Masak Jean Rabel (l’Hécatombe de Jean Rabel), fen jiye 1987 (2)

 

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As news of the massacre of peasants at Jean Rabel reaches Port-au-Prince, Jean Dominique tries to make sense of the situation based on the scarce information at hand.  All that is known is that a group of peasants in the grassroots group Tèt Ansanm who were demanding land reform have been killed by other peasants as the result of the machinations of Duvalierist landowners.  Jean Rabel is in a remote area and the press can not yet go there.  There are conflicting reports about the number of dead; tens to hundreds are reported dead, and there is the possibility that the death counts have been inflated by the aggressors.

July1989_chantepeyizan_cartoon_1 copy

Cartoon from Tèt Kole Ti Peyizan Ayisyen’s 1989 pamphlet commemorating the Jean Rabel massacre. Wealthy landowners, the army, the Church, and the US, among others, are destroying Haitian peasant farmers. (Source: Radio Haïti Inter paper archive.)

This program revisits several other recordings — the July 3, 1987 interview with members of Tèt Ansanm in which they they warn that the situation is getting more perilous for Jean-Marie Vincent’s missionary team, the July 28, 1987 broadcast from Radio Soleil in which members of Tèt Ansanm who escaped the massacre described what they saw and experienced, Konpè Filo’s interview with Rémy Lucas and Jean-Michel Richardson earlier in 1987 after the violence at Gros Sable, and Michèle Montas’ interview with Father Jean-Marie Vincent on July 28, 1987.  While Jean-Marie Vincent is careful not to criticize Church authorities directly, the Association Nationale des Agronômes Haïtiens is more direct in its denunciation; in an open letter, they claim that bishops and priests have long been attacking Tèt Ansanm and Father Jean-Marie’s missionary team through inflammatory sermons, and that the Church is implicated in this violence.  According to speakers from the community of Plaine de l’Arbre, Tèt Ansanm had also been promoting national production and the consumption of local agricultural products by blocking imported food and food aid (manje sinistre), which created resentment for peasants whose families could not eat without this aid.  The recording concludes with Father Jean-Marie’s words on the future of Tèt Ansanm and grassroots peasant organization.

Inter-Actualités Magazine, Special Report on Jean Rabel: Land Ownership, Anti-Communism, the Catholic Church, and Rumors, 16 August 1987

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Download: Inter-Actualités Magazine, Repòtaj Spesyal sou Jean Rabel: Pwopriyetè Tè, Anti-Kominis, Legliz Katolik, ak Twipotaj, 16 daout 1987 (1)

Inter-Actualités Magazine, Repòtaj Spesyal sou Jean Rabel: Pwopriyetè Tè, Anti-Kominis, Legliz Katolik, ak Twipotaj, 16 daout 1987 (2)

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Three weeks after the massacre at Jean Rabel, the independent media is still forbidden to visit the area, so Jean Dominique sits with Michèle Pierre-Louis (who had recently visited the region as part of Mission Alpha) and agronomist Chavannes Jean-Baptiste (the founder of the Peasant Movement of Papaye) to discuss the aftermath of the massacre and the factors underpinning it. Pierre-Louis observes a great deal of hostility toward Jean-Marie Vincent and his missionary team among the peasants of Lacoma. But this hostility is the product of intentional strategy, one that the local landowners adopted when Tèt Ansanm’s ideology called into question existing social structure.

Cartoon from Tèt Kole's 1989 pamphlet commemorating the Jean Rabel massacre.  Peasant farmers plan to cut down the tree of injustice and oppression with the axe of liberation.  (Source: Radio Haïti Inter paper archive)

Cartoon from Tèt Kole’s 1989 pamphlet commemorating the Jean Rabel massacre. Peasant farmers plan to cut down the tree of injustice and oppression with the axe of liberation. (Source: Radio Haïti Inter paper archive)

These landowners — threatened by the possibility of losing their traditional power amid post-Duvalier political change — have manipulated the peasants of the Jean Rabel area, pitting them against one another, currying favor with certain groups of peasants with promises of land redistribution and favoritism. They have created a situation, in Jean-Baptiste’s words, in which the “little dog eats the little dog, poor peasants are killing poor peasants just like themselves.” According to Jean-Baptiste, the landowners and their allies (including certain radio stations and the traditional Catholic Church) have been part of a misinformation campaign, accusing Jean-Marie Vincent of being a communist, creating a climate of fear in which peasants believe that communists are going to seize their land, homes, and possessions. Divisions within the Catholic Church — between the traditional, reactionary Church hierarchy and the “ti legliz” preaching liberation theology and promoting the rights of the poor dispossessed peasantry – are also responsible for the massacre, and, according to Jean-Baptiste, the Church should be held responsible. Interview Jean Dominique.

Jeunes Étudiants Chrétiens (JEC) of Port-de-Paix Support for Tèt Ansanm, 6 July 1987

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Download: Jeunes Etudiants Chrétiens (JEC) Port-de-Paix, July 6

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Announcement of the JEC’s support of the équipe missionaire and the peasants in Jean Rabel, denouncing the macoute regime.

Father Jean-Marie Vincent on the Jean Rabel Massacre, 28 July 1987

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Download: Pè Jean-Marie Vincent pale sou masak Jean Rabel, 28/7/1987

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Father Jean-Marie Vincent — Catholic priest and director of Caritas — speaks about the recent massacre of peasants in Jean Rabel, northwest Haiti. He blames an alliance of local oligarchs (the Lucas family and Jean-Michel Richardson) and macoutes; they in turn blame Father Vincent, claiming that he armed the members of Tèt Ansanm and incited them to violence. He says he is used to being blamed, attacked, threatened, and called a communist; it is to be expected when one organizes with peasants and encourages them to defend their rights. He rejects claims that the members of Tèt Ansanm are responsible for the violence in Jean Rabel, saying instead that the oligarchs and macoutes are creating a climate of fear and making the victims out to be the aggressors. Father Vincent explains that the conflict began when peasants in Gros Sable reclaimed their land after the departure of Jean-Claude Duvalier in 1986. It reached its peak with the massacre in Jean Rabel, which has lasted several days. Relatively few people died on the first day, but in the following days, brigades under the direction of those oligarchs attacked and killed people as they attempted to return home and within the hospital. These powerful landowners have impunity. When asked about the Catholic Church’s position (as there are local church authorities who are in opposition to Tèt Ansanm and part of the attacking forces), Father Vincent replies that his order and Caritas have an official mandate to work with and organize the peasants, but that he does not want to risk saying more than that and will wait for higher church authorities to explain their position. Local landowners and oligarchs are profiting from post-dictatorship political instability, leveraging their economic and social capital to crush peasant movements. Father Vincent does not believe that this will be the end of Tèt Ansanm; grassroots peasants groups are the only hope for the masses, so despite suffering and death, they will not disappear. Interview Michèle Montas.

Face à l’Opinion: Father Rénald Clérismé on the First Anniversary of Jean-Marie Vincent’s Assassination, 24 Aug. 1995

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Face à l’Opinion: Pè Rénald Clérismé sou Premyè Anivèsè Asasina Jean-Marie Vincent, 24/8/1995 (1)

Face à l’Opinion: Pè Rénald Clérismé sou Premyè Anivèsè Asasina Jean-Marie Vincent, 24/8/1995 (2)

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Father Jean Marie Vincent, a Catholic priest who founded the peasant rights association “Tet Kole Ti Peyizan Ayisyen” in the small town of Jean Rabel, was assassinated on August 28, 1994 under the military regime. On the first anniversary of Father Vincent’s death, Jean Renald Clérismé, a former Catholic priest (and eventual Minister of Foreign Affairs of Haiti from 2006- 2008) remembers Jean Marie Vincent, his devotion to the peasantry (“Jean-Marie grew up with a boundless love for the peasantry”) and his commitment to liberation theology and universal dignity for all. Clérismé also discusses development and underdevelopment, corruption, and the role of the international community in Haiti, as well as Aristide’s return and the US and UN occupations of 1994-1995. Clérismé explains that in order to truly honor Jean-Marie Vincent’s memory, they must seek justice not only for him but for all the victims of the regime, including the poor and invisible. Interview Jean Dominique.

“Everyone is demanding justice for Janboul [Jean-Marie], justice for [Antoine] Izméry, justice for [Guy] Malary, because those people were visible. But a penniless unfortunate on the street, that they seize and they beat, and they take him and rape his brothers, rape his sisters, rape his mother – those people, too, they deserve to be commemorated, for us to say that they were people too and to put them together with Janboul. We can’t honor Janboul if we don’t put those people’s problems together with the commemoration we’re doing for him.” – Rénald Clérismé

Jean Rabel: Rémy Lucas and Jean-Michel Richardson, date unknown 1987

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Download: Jean Rabel: Rémy Lucas ak Jean-Michel Richardson (1)

Jean Rabel: Rémy Lucas ak Jean-Michel Richardson (2)

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Interview with Rémy Lucas (local oligarch) and Jean-Michel Richardson on their roles in and perceptions of the violence in Gros Sable on February 17, 1987. Lucas and Richardson dismiss allegations that they were responsible for the burning of peasant houses in Gros Sable or any of the events in the Jean Rabel area. They insist that they never had a problem with anybody — they are the victims and that the real blame lies with the “missionary team” of Father Jean-Marie Vincent, who was organizing local peasants to claim their rights and land through the Tèt Ansanm movement. It is not the peasants’ fault, they say, because they are being poorly guided. Lucas and Richardson claim, variously, that Father Vincent is corrupt, that he’s only claiming to do things for the peasants but is in fact profiting, that he’s done a few good works but that it’s been insufficient, that he’s responsible for the introduction of ill-suited North American pigs to Haiti (via his work with Caritas), and that the missionaries personally burned down Richardson’s factory and therefore only increased poverty and hunger in the area by depriving people of their jobs. Lucas and Richardson claim that Father Vincent is not acting as a priest should, that he is creating disunity rather than unity and dividing the community. They defend the reputation of Nicol Poitevien, another powerful local landowner, denying that he was a Macoute. Richardson likewise says he was never a Macoute himself: he was in government, but he never had the “soul” of a Macoute. Lucas claims that he is part of a new, more open generation of the Lucas family. He hedges when asked how much land his family really owns, and says that the peasants have cut down most of the trees on it, anyway.  Interview Konpè Filo. 

Jean Rabel Massacre – Father Jean Rénald Clérismé, Nicol Poitevien, and Jean-Michel Richardson, 30 July 1987

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Download: Jean Rabel – Pè Jean Rénald Clérismé, Nicol Poitivien, ak yon moun enkoni kap defann grandon yo

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Part 1 (0:00 to 3:51): Father Jean Rénald Clérismé makes a hurried call to Radio Haiti-Inter about the terror faced by the peasant members of Tèt Ansanm in the area of Beauchamp near Jean Rabel. The peasants are afraid to sleep at home, because people come to their homes at night to threaten them.Uniformed aggressors are all over the area, looking for members of Tèt Ansanm and threatening them. They have forbidden Tèt Ansanm and Caritas to have meetings, they are pillaging the peasants’ goods, and they have burned down the house of an agronomist who works with Tèt Ansanm and threaten to burn down more peasant homes. Father Clérismé names the four principal aggressors. He says the worst part is that the Haitian Army is responsible for having sent them.

Part 2 (3:55-8:54) Interview with Nicol Poitevien, one of the landowners from Jean Rabel who is accused of being responsible for this violence. Poitevien claims that everyone’s got it wrong: it’s the members of Tèt Ansanm and specifically Father Jean-Marie Vincent who are responsible for the violence, not himself and the other local oligarchs. “The name ‘gwoupman’ is a nice name, but what they’re doing isn’t nice.’ Poitevien claims the peasants are being manipulated and used by “communist” Father Vincent.

Part 3 (8:56-15:00): Jean-Michel Richardson defends the Poitevien, Lucas, and Richardson landowners, claiming that Father Vincent’s missionary team has been organizing the peasants of Tèt Ansanm to engage in dechoukaj, burn down houses, and injure other peasants. He would like to have a press conference to present his proof of this, and says that for every ten peasants who are members of Tèt Ansanm, he’ll show you ten peasants who are victims of Tèt Ansanm.

Tèt Ansanm members’ testimony, 3 July 1987

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Download: Sitiyasyon nan Jean Rabel avan masak la, 3 jiyè 1987

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Tèt Ansanm members’ testimony; July 3, 1987: Disturbances in and around Jean Rabel since General Namphy, the head of the ruling Conseil National de Gouvernment (CNG) visited the region. In rural areas around Jean Rabel, the macoutes, local leaders and police have come together to destroy Jean-Marie Vincent’s Catholic mission that has been working with peasant organizations. Since Friday they have been in La Montagne, and the surprising thing is that the direktè katechis (local catechism instructors) are collaborating with the macoutes. There have been attacks against the Catholic missionaries and the peasants themselves. Local civil, military, and religious authorities are not protecting people. They have come to Port-de-Paix to ask for authorities to intervene.

Caritas’ Efforts to Replace the Creole Pig, November 1986

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Download: Reportage cochons créole/caritas Nov 86, 4ème partie

Discussion of the eradication of the Creole pig in the early 1980s (due to fears of swine flu) through the Programme pour l’Eradication de la Peste Porcine Africaine et pour le Développement de l’Elevage Porcin (PEPPADEP), and the eradication program’s deleterious effects on the peasants.  At the time, the Creole pig was a main source of financial possibility stability for peasant families — “the peasant’s bank.”  Initial attempts to replace Creole pigs with industrial North American pigs were disastrous, as the North American pigs were ill-suited to the environment and Haitian peasants lacked the means to care for them. The program discusses subsequent attempts by the Catholic NGO Caritas to replace the Creole pig with similar pigs imported from Jamaica.